Doctorate of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (Post-Graduate)

The decision to receive a master’s level education at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine was, by far, one of the best decisions I’ve made in life. I am living my passion! I am now part of a major integrative medicine practice at an urban hospital. I thank PCOM for their role in building my foundation and giving me the courage and support to fly.
Angela Johnson, LAc, DiplOM, MSTOM, MPH

Doctorate of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (Post-Graduate)

You know each patient needs something different. Strengthening your skill-set and enhancing your traditional Chinese medicine training in our program will help you deliver the right treatment to each person that walks through your door. You've always been a healer – continue on your journey as one with us. 

If you've been looking for a post-graduate doctoral program in San Diego, particularly a post-graduate acupuncture programs, then your search ends here at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

The purpose of the doctor of Oriental medicine and acupuncture education program is to foster self-directed learning and critical thinking skills within the framework of traditional Chinese medicine to the point at which they become defining characteristics of the graduate's professionalism, striving to broaden and deepen the practitioner's knowledge and skills in patient care. Since the post-graduate doctorate in acupuncture is not required for licensure, this program provides advanced education, cultivating students into leaders of the profession. Graduates use the post-graduate doctorate to enhance their careers as experts in the field as they contribute to the advancement of the medicine.

Pacific College has assembled an expert faculty to present an inspiring curriculum based on the integration of biomedicine with the modern and classical application of Chinese medicine. These topics are supported by Chinese medical language studies, research, and advanced clinical training.

The Post-Graduate Doctorate program offers a six-semester, 1,257.5 hour, 63.5 credit program of study. It is composed of a series of courses in five tracks in which each post-graduate doctor of acupuncture completes 42.5 units of didactic coursework and 21 units of clinical courses. The five tracks are:

Track 1: Family Medicine (2 credits each)

  • Mental Health (Semester 1)
  • Geriatrics (Semester 2)
  • Orthopedics (Semester 3)
  • Neurology (Semester 4)
  • Women's Health (Semester 5)
  • Preventive Medicine (Semester 5)
  • Pediatrics (Semester 6)

Post-graduate doctoral fellows receive an advanced course of study in the following medical concentrations: pediatrics, neurology, mental health, orthopedics, geriatrics, women’s health, and preventative medicine. Each of these areas focuses on the realistic and relevant integration of biomedical diagnosis and treatment with differentiation and treatment from the traditional Oriental medical perspective. While studying biomedical and modern TCM approaches to disease, the student is challenged to consider the ways in which classical Chinese texts are still relevant today.

Track 2: Application of Chinese Classics (1.5 credits each)

  • Nei Jing (Semester 1)
  • Nan Jing (Semester 2)
  • Shang Han Lun (Semester 3)
  • Jin Gui Yao Lue (Semester 4)
  • Wen Bing (Semester 5)

Post-graduate doctoral fellows compare and contrast classical Chinese medicine with modern treatment techniques, and critically examine both, with the ability to discriminate among various translations of classical texts. Emphasis in on understanding the foundations of the medicine represented by classical texts, and the maturation of those theories into their modern form, so as to achieve original thought regarding the future evolution of Oriental medicine theory.

Track 3: Chinese Medical Chinese Language 1-6 (1.5 credits each)

This track enables the post-graduate doctoral fellow to understand the basic features of the literary language of Chinese medicine and its relationship to the language of various classical periods and the modern vernacular of China. The aim of this track is to develop a broader intellectual perspective in Chinese medicine through exposure to the philosophical and cultural foundations of the medicine in its source language. Excerpts from source texts of Chinese medicine are translated to expand knowledge base and enhance research abilities to continue self-directed learning and contribute to the profession by way of translation and commentary.

Track 4: Evidence-Based Medicine

  • Clinical Research Methods 1(1.5 credits)
  • Clinical Research Methods 2 (1.5 credits)
  • Clinical Research Methods 3 (1.5 credits)
  • Clinical Research Proposal (1 credit)
  • Clinical Capstone Project 1 (1 credit)
  • Clinical Capstone Project 2 (1 credit)
  • Clinical Capstone Presentation (.5 credit)

This track presents clinical research methodology, design, and biostatistics along with problem-solving methodologies, to expand clinical reasoning and research abilities. Courses enable the post-graduate doctoral fellows to validate their individual clinical conclusions, as well as the general principles of Chinese medicine, and to complete a clinical capstone project worthy of addition to the profession’s knowledge base.

Track 5: Clinical Training

The Clinical Training track is a comprehensive curriculum that allows post-graduate doctoral fellows to strengthen the necessary skills used in clinical practice. The track is made up of five components including hands-on training in the Family Medicine Clinic, analysis and collaboration in the Case Review & Mentorship experience, detailed case discussions in the Grand Rounds, supervisory training in the Supervision & Teaching Skills experience, and clinical observation in the Integrative Medicine Practicum. 

The purpose of the post-graduate doctoral program is to foster self-directed learning and critical thinking skills within the framework of traditional Chinese medicine to where it becomes a defining characteristic of the graduate's professionalism. It further strives to broaden and deepen the practitioner's knowledge and skills in patient care. Since a doctorate is not required for licensure, this program provides advanced education, cultivating students into leaders of the profession. Graduates use the post-graduate doctorate to enhance their careers as experts in the field as they contribute to the advancement of the medicine.

To accomplish this and its specific educational objectives, Pacific College has assembled an expert faculty to present an inspiring curriculum based on the integration of biomedicine with the modern and classical application of Chinese medicine. These topics are supported by Chinese medical language studies, research, and advanced clinical training.

Federal Consumer Disclosure Information About This Program

​Pacific College of Oriental Medicine is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. The college and all its programs in San Diego are approved by BPPE. The college’s MSTOM, MSAc (CH and NY), and Post-Graduate Doctorate (SD) programs are accredited by ACAOM. For important information on program costs, completion and placement rates, median debt incurred, etc., please see the program disclosure document.


Admissions Requirements

Is state licensure a prerequisite to either doctoral program?

No.


Value and Benefits of Degree and Courses

What is the value of a DAOM as a credential when the LAc is the industry standard?

The doctoral title and degree will provide the licensed acupuncturist well-deserved recognition and respect from their biomedical peers. All other factors being equal, we believe integrative medical settings will prioritize hiring doctors of acupuncture. Medical doctors, and other allied health providers may be more likely to refer to a doctor of acupuncture.

While licensed acupuncturist is a common descriptor in our field today, it is a license title, not a degree. We believe that as colleges award many new DAc or DAOM degrees, doctor of acupuncture will become the most common way to refer to an acupuncturist.

When considering a doctorate, remember that regional accreditation is the gold standard of accreditation and degrees from such institutions carry tremendous respect and credibility.


Degree Title Awarded

Why do the DAOM (EL) and the DAOM (PG) have the same title? How will people in the field know which program we have completed?

There is still much discussion in the Oriental medicine community as to whether there should be one title or two and what those titles should be.

Until there is an acceptable, different consensus title suggested by the profession, a graduate from Pacific College’s entry-level DAOM will receive a Doctorate of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (or Doctorate of Acupuncture if you graduated from the MSAc). The post-gradate doctor’s degree will be the same but also carry the designation Post Graduate. We expect a resolution to this issue soon.

What is the difference between the Post Graduate DAOM and the DAc/DAOM (EL)?

The DAOM (PG) is a post-graduate program designed to develop advanced skills in family and integrative medicine, research, Chinese classics, Chinese language, teaching, leadership and clinical supervision skills. Graduates will make significant contribution to the knowledge base of the AOM profession through their capstone projects.

What is the degree that will be awarded upon successful completion of the program? And, what titles will graduates of the program hold? Is the use of the title allowed in all states?

Upon successful completion, the degree of Doctor of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (DAOM) or Doctor of Acupuncture (DAc) will be awarded. They are earned academic degrees from a regionally accredited institution. Individual states may have guidelines describing the manner in which health care providers may use the term “doctor” or the initials “Dr.” We know of none that prevent an individual with an earned doctorate from an accredited college from using the term in their professional practice, particularly when followed by the degree name.


Accreditation

How is the school accredited?

PCOM is accredited by the WASC Senior College and University Commission (WSCUC).

Is a Career in Acupuncture Right for You? Take The Career Readiness Quiz
Request Info

Clicking the "Send Request" button below constitutes your express written consent to be called and/or texted by Pacific College of Oriental Medicine at the number(s) you provided, regarding furthering your education. You understand that these calls may be generated using an automated technology.

Chat With Us

.

Ready to Become a Healer?

a