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Acupuncture, Massage, Newsletter - January 2008 | Issue 47



In this issue you will find: Important PCOM Dates

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Pacific College Presents: Study With Giovanni Maciocia

For more information on any of these lectures or to register for an event please click here to register online or call (800) 729-0941 ext 121.

In conjunction with Pacific College, Giovanni Maciocia one of the most respected practitioners of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine in the world, is presenting a series of lecture for 2008.  While firmly rooted in traditional Chinese medicine, Giovanni’s ideas are innovative and adapted to Western conditions and diseases.  He brings a combination of classical training and clinical experience to this unique lecture series.

The first scheduled lecture will take place in San Diego, February 23 and 24.  Giovanni will discuss The Channel System and Clinical Applications Utilizing Channels. This lecture will present the fundamental clinical applications of channel theory so that the student will acquire a foundation from which to further study channel pathology, point indications and actions, and their applications in acupuncture and moxibustion therapy. As this is an extremely broad subject, Giovanni will present the clinical application of Luo channels as a model from which to approach the clinical applications of the other primary and secondary channels.

In Chicago on March 15-16,  Giovanni will present a two part series on  The Psyche in Chinese Medicine: Treatment of Mental-Emotional Disorders, and Advanced Tongue Diagnosis. The first event concerning the psyche will explore the nature and functions of the Shen, Hun, Po, Yi, and Zhi in Chinese medicine. Emotions and their connection to the psyche will be evaluated. The workshop will also present the etiology, pathology, and treatment of depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Part two of this workshop, Advanced Tongue Diagnosis will deal with more advanced aspects of Chinese tongue diagnosis. Tongue diagnosis is one of the pillars of Chinese diagnosis and its importance and usefulness lies in its reliability and objectivity. The workshop will discuss the clinical significance of tongue-body color, tongue-body shapes and tongue coating in detail. This will be done in a clinically-relevant way with many examples and cases derived from practice. Giovanni will present many new interpretations of tongue diagnosis derived from his 32-years of practice. In Los Angeles on April 12-13, and in New York from May 17-18, 2008, Giovanni will present a two part series on The Psyche in Chinese Medicine: Treatment of Mental-Emotional Disorders, and The Extraordinary Channels. The first event concerning the psyche will explore the nature and functions of the Shen, Hun, Po, Yi, and Zhi in Chinese medicine. Emotions and their connection to the psyche will be evaluated. The workshop will also present the etiology, pathology, and treatment of depression, anxiety, and insomnia.

In San Francisco on June 7-8, Giovanni will discuss The Pathology and Treatment of Dampness and Phlegm.  Dampness and Phlegm are two extremely common pathogenic factors encountered in the clinic.  Both Dampness and Phlegm result from a dysfunction in the metabolism of fluids and our Western lifestyle, with its irregular diet, stress and overwork.

Giovanni Maciocia is one of the most highly respected practitioners of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine in Europe. He trained in England at the International College of Oriental medicine and graduated in 1974 after a three-year course. He has been in practice ever since. In 1980, 1982, and 1987, he attended three postgraduate courses in acupuncture at the Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine in China. Giovanni can read Chinese and therefore has access to all the Chinese medicine textbooks, old and modern, published in China. Pacific College of Oriental Medicine and Giovanni Maciocia combine forces to enlighten practitioners and acupuncturists across the nation.

For more information on any of these lectures or to register for an event please click here to register online or call (800) 729-0941 ext 121.

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Pacific College Celebrates the Chinese New Year

In celebration of Chinese New Year, Pacific College has planned free events on each of its three campuses.

Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in New York will be hosting an open house on Saturday, February 2, 2008 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Following the open house, a celebration of the Chinese New Year will be held from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. and will include free community acupuncture for relaxation, as well as a tai ji and qi gong and a martial arts workshop.  This event will also include an informational lecture titled, “Chinese Astrology: Year of the Rat.”

Pacific’s San Diego campus will be hosting a free event for the public on Saturday, February 9th, 2008 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.  Free acupuncture and massage treatments will be offered from 10:00 to 1:00 pm. There will be 15-minute acupuncture treatment targeted for smoking cessation and stress reduction, as well as 10-minute tui na massages.  This event will also include Tai Ji and Qi Gong demonstrations, an informational lecture titled,  “A Discussion of Integrative Medicine and Its Profession” and lectures featuring women’s health and pediatrics.

Pacific’s Chicago campus will be holding a similar Chinese New Year celebration, Saturday, February 16, 2008 from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The campus will be offering complimentary acupuncture treatments, qi-building exercises, and introductions to faculty and staff.

Celebrations at each campus will provide refreshments and an open invitation to the public to tour the campus. Staff and faculty will also be available to further attendees’ knowledge of Pacific College’s programs and the field of Oriental medicine.

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Herbs for Prostate Health

Prostate disorders affect millions of men in the United States each year. Not just afflicting the elderly, over half of 49-50 year-old men have enlarged prostates, and a 1 in 4 chance of developing cancerous cells.

Located just below the bladder, the prostate is a walnut-sized gland that produces seminal fluid. Disorders of the prostate may include inflammation called prostatitis, enlargement of the gland, and cancer. Fortunately, much of this can be avoided through proper nutrition and supplementation. Fruit- and vegetable-rich diets aid in protecting the prostate from illness, supplying the essential nutrients needed to ensure healthy function for decades. A surprisingly high proportion of prostate disorder patients rely on complementary health practices not prescribed by physicians, according to a study by Gary D. Kao, M.D., Ph.D.

For thousands of years, herbal remedies have aided in preventing and treating prostate disorders and illnesses. First and foremost is Saw Palmetto, which is taken from the berries of a small palm tree growing in the southeastern coastal United States. A traditional Native American remedy, saw palmetto contains beta-sitosterol and other plant estrogens that aid in reducing prostate enlargement. The herb inhibits certain enzymes that initiate prostate growth. According to recent studies, it is widely used in many Asian, African and European countries and compositional analysis of the berry of S. repens exhibits sterols and free fatty acids as its major constituents.

Soy may also represent hope for those suffering from prostate disorders. According to a University of Michigan study, a variety of laboratory and epidemiologic research suggests soy may play a role in the prevention of prostate cancer. Soy has been found to decrease the growth of prostate cancer cells, and can also be used for preventative medicine.

An antioxidant found in tomatoes, called Lycopene may also help lower the risk of prostate cancer. The National Cancer Institute reports that men who consumed more lycopene suffered less prostate cancer, after an analysis of over 72 research studies. The antioxidant aids in both prostate cancer prevention and treatment.

Nettle is an energy stimulant, used to treat hay fever, digestive weakness, and joint support. During times of lost appetite and energy, this herb stimulates metabolic activity which may aid in ensuring prostate health. The herb may also help alleviate symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

In alternative medicine, Pygeum is often administered with Saw Palmetto. Obtained from a tree bark, it is an indigenous African remedy that aids in treating prostate enlargement.

Prepared from rye pollen, Cernilton is documented for treating BHP and prostatitis. German studies show that the herb produces an anti-edematous and anti-inflammatory effect on subjects.

Alternative medicine offers numerous non-invasive treatments for prostate illness prevention and therapy. Supplementing a healthy diet with these powerful herbs could help prevent serious prostate illness and cancer later in life.

Gary D. Kao, M.D., Ph.D. Use of complementary health practices by prostate carcinoma patients undergoing radiation therapy. Cancer, 88:3, 615-619.

Jillian L. Capodice,* Debra L. Bemis, Ralph Buttyan, Steven A. Kaplan, and Aaron E. Katz. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2005 December; 2(4): 495–501.
Published online 2005 October 10. doi: 10.1093/ecam/neh128.

Mark A Moyad, MPH,* Wael A Sakr, MD,† Daisaku Hirano, MD,‡ and Gary J Miller, MD, PhD. Complementary Medicine for Prostate Cancer: Effects of Soy and Fat Consumption. Rev Urol. 2001; 3(Suppl 2): S20–S30.

Penny AllenPollen extract improves pain in men with CP/CPPS. Urology Times. Cleveland: Sep 2006.Vol.34, Iss. 11;  pg. 21, 1 pgs

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Chinese Wisdom: Quote of the Day

If you are patient in one moment of anger, you will escape a hundred days of sorrow.

 ~ The Book of Odes